Column

Black Tourmaline Is Supposed to Help You Set Boundaries—But What If You Go Too Far?

It’s easier to cut people out than to learn to differentiate between the chronically demanding and the occasionally needy. It’s war, we tell ourselves.

Sep 24, 2018
How the Immortal Jellyfish Helps Me Rewrite My Queer Childhood

I have no desire to live forever. But what I would give to return to adolescence and do it over, even once! To kiss who I wanted to kiss, not settling for her brother.

Sep 20, 2018
The Love of Korean Cooking I Share With My White Mother

In her illness, Korean food was all my Polish-American mom from Jersey wanted to eat. It was all that she could bear.

Sep 19, 2018
Citrine and the Cost of Happiness: How Conflating Money with Success Keeps Us All Trapped

If citrine is supposed to bring you abundance, what might it bring if you didn’t need so much wealth in our capitalist hellscape?

Aug 29, 2018
We Were Prepared for a Storm, But Not Hurricane Harvey

There will be as many different iterations of this storm, and the ones to come, as there are Houstonians. And we have to hear them—they’re what will determine our map for the next one.

Aug 27, 2018
Cripple Perks: The Unreasonable Luxury of Living While Disabled

“Accommodations are things that we need, and deserve, in order to lead our lives. But they’re treated—we are treated—like we’re trying to pull one over on the rest of society.”

Aug 15, 2018
Mourning My Lost Dark as a Blind Artist

For me, distinctions between light and dark have dissolved as my blindness has worsened. I do not experience blindness as darkness or blackness.

Aug 14, 2018
On Being Young, Scrappy, and (Sometimes) Satisfied

Remain forever hungry, or enjoy the tried-and-true? Sometimes, I learned, it’s okay to double down on the life you have.

Aug 13, 2018
Dreaming Machines: Fairy Tales in the Age of Artificial Intelligence

What, exactly, are the building blocks that make a fairy tale a fairy tale? And who—or what—might be making them in the future?

Jul 24, 2018
Obsidian and Finding the Truth Beneath the Surface

When we dress up, when we experiment, sometimes it’s because we are trying to discover who we are. But sometimes it’s because we already know and have nothing to hide.

Jul 23, 2018
How We Create Personal Myths (and Why They Matter)

My parental separation was vastly less traumatic than what is happening to children at the border. But this narrative lives inside me.

Jul 18, 2018
ハーフ (Hafu): On the Fetishization and Mistranslation of a Biracial Identity

Hafu carries insinuations of otherness; of not belonging, but being fetishized. How do I carry this name and this history at once?

Jul 16, 2018
Opals Are Said to Make Us Everything We Are All at Once, and There’s Nothing Scarier

I’ve been wondering what my edges really are, and finding they don’t exist. I feel myself shimmer with every conflicting thought.

Jun 25, 2018
More Mother, Less Detective: Where I’ve Found Grace Without a Diagnosis for My Son

Not knowing happens to all mothers, and to all of us—if we are breathing, we are without escape from things we can’t know.

Jun 25, 2018
How I Learned to Reconcile the Distance Between Experience and Memory

As my mother loses the ability to remember, I find myself playing with my own memory.

Jun 12, 2018
Finding Peace at the Rothko Chapel: What Local Arts Can Teach Us About Our Cities—and Ourselves

In Houston, as with everywhere else, the arts serve as tiny lifeboats—and sometimes, if we’re lucky, we all find ourselves floating together.

Jun 11, 2018
温もり (Nukumori): When the Distance Between You and Your Loved Ones Disappears

Nukumori can refer to a kind of existence not dependent on physical proximity, allowing a person’s presence to linger with you even if they cannot.

Jun 06, 2018
The Rodeo: A Holdover from Texas Lore, and Part of the Changing Story Houston Tells About Itself

If traditions like the rodeo can accommodate Houston’s diversity, whole new traditions will be formed—leaving us with something even better.

May 23, 2018