Cover Photo: The will of Peter Cocke, Jona Whipple's seventh great-grandfather, from 1803.
The will of Peter Cocke, Jona Whipple's seventh great-grandfather, from 1803.

Nineteen Slaves

“I thought I would be able to claim some exemption from the darkest time in our history.”

Gone with the Wind

but not all of thembut then they had been given reservations to live onbut then they had been freed

shikaakwa

their

Burket’s Explanation of the New Testament

An inventory of Peter Cocke's possessions.

The Emancipator

Knoxville Register

peoplethings

s slaves. He was willed to my seventh great-grandmother, Mary, to be sold in the event of her death or remarriage, and the proceeds from his sale were to be divided among Peter’s children. In 1810, Hall paid the Cocke family a sum of five hundred dollars through a lawyer, with the intention of buying his freedom. Whatever dangers awaited him outside of Tennessee, outside of slavery, Hall wanted out.

vergangenheitsbewältigung

vergangenheitsbewältigung

depraved and corrupting man of color

but I have reaped its benefits.but am I a part of something that continues to allow these terrible things to happen?

protectionnecessitykindness

Jona Whipple's writing has appeared in Bluestem, The Hairpin, The Chicago Reader, The Flounce, and Hypertext Magazine. She is an archivist in Chicago, and is currently at work on a collection of personal essays inspired by her extensive junior high journal entries. www.cupcakeheartbreak.com