Cover Photo: cropped image of red and green game pieces from the board game Sorry! by Hasbro Games
Image by Hasbro Games

No, I Don’t Want Your Advice on How My Kids or I Can Be “Cured”

I’m not looking for a cure—not for my kids, and not for me. Any treatment we choose is merely a tool to help us enjoy our lives.

emotionally disturbed

orelse

Sorry!

He’s going to try to sell me something

boysproblems

allergiesgutsinflammationour babiesthat asshole

How could he possibly think that I want my kids to be any different?

doif he were less distracted, he would learn more during his swim lesson—if he won’t wear button-down shirts or eat a hamburger, how do you expect him to survive in the world?


I’m not looking for a cure—not for my kids, and not for me. Any treatment we choose is a tool to help us enjoy our lives.

Recently, our family was on vacation in Washington, DC. The four of us—my husband, Eight, Ten, and I—traveled by Metro around town, the train itself as exciting to my kids as the museums and monuments. One time we exited onto the platform and the tunnel suddenly grew loud and chaotic, because the train across from us let its passengers off at the same time.

It’s too much.

Katie's work has appeared in Catapult, Slate, Full Grown People, The Chronicle of Higher Education, and more. She’s the author of more than ten books, including the IPPY Gold award-winner EVEN IF YOU’RE BROKEN: Essays on Sexual Assault and MeToo, the INDIE Gold award-winning THE FREELANCE ACADEMIC: Transform Your Creative Life and Career, and the bestselling LIFE OF THE MIND INTERRUPTED: Essays on Disability and Mental Health in Higher Education. A professor of law and creative writing, she lives in Chapel Hill, N.C.