Cover Photo: A detail from the movie poster for the film Beetlejuice, depicting the titular character with a bride and a decapitated groom
Movie poster art via The Geffen Company/Warner Bros.

The Handbook for the Recently Deceased

In the film ‘Beetlejuice’, death is exaggeration. To die is to become a different size, to be viewed as grotesque by an outside observer.

This isScaring Children, a column by A. E. Osworth that explores children’s horror media from the nineties and early aughts through the lens of queer adulthood.

Wait a fucking second.

Crap. Crap crap crap.

Beetlejuice

Handbook for the Recently Deceased

That is what happens when they die.

Handbook for the Recently Deceased

am

can’twon’t

Beetlejuice

Beetlejuiceis

Beetlejuice

Beetlejuice

can’twon’t

That’ll do

A. E. Osworth is part-time Faculty at The New School, where they teach undergraduates the art of digital storytelling. Their novel, We Are Watching Eliza Bright, about a game developer dealing with harassment (and narrated collectively by a fictional subreddit), is available now. They have an eight-year freelancing career and you can find their work on Autostraddle, Guernica, Quartz, Electric Lit, Paper Darts, Mashable, and drDoctor, among others.