Cover Photo: Who killed Laura Palmer? by Hannah Lamb-Vines

Who killed Laura Palmer?

A Rhetorical Pentadic Analysis of 'Twin Peaks' Episode 209, "Arbitrary Law"

‘Twin Peaks’, A Cultural PhenomenonTwin PeaksTwin Peaks

A Grammar of Motives

some kind A Grammar of Motivesthat is specified by the rhetor for the agentRhetorical Criticism

Rhetorical CriticismA Grammar of MotivesRhetorical Criticism)

The other four terms, when featured, fall into their own philosophical schools: an emphasis on agent places the artifact in the school of idealism, which places the greatest importance upon the “mind or spirit” of the individual; an emphasis on agency places the artifact in the school of pragmatism, a philosophy concerned with the means or instruments that can be used to reach a goal; when purpose receives the greatest emphasis, the artifact communicates through the school of mysticism, which focuses on identification and unity; finally, an artifact which features act will fall into the philosophical school of realism, which purports that “universal principles” and “abstract concepts” are more real than objects (thus, the act is a principle as opposed to a material object). It is not always necessary to apply these philosophical schools to an analysis of an artifact. However, their inclusion provides greater insight into the functions and appropriate applications of the Dramatic Pentad.

Twin Peaks

Twin Peaks

Twin PeaksTwin Peaks

anything

Twin Peaks

Twin PeaksTwin Peaks

Twin PeaksTwin PeaksTwin Peaks

Twin peaks’, a cultural phenomenon. NerdHQ.

A grammar of motives

Rhetorical criticism

Central States Speech Journal

Rhetorical criticism

Twin peaks

Hannah Lamb-Vines holds a BA in creative writing from The New School. A Texas transplant, she now divides her time between Brooklyn, NY, Manhattan, NY, and the bridges and tunnels that run between. www.whitevines.xyz